2019 Program Book

Forum information

Theme

Urban Life of the 21st Century: Sustainable, Safe and Healthy?


Date

Day 1 October 20, 2021 8:00 - 17:00

Day 2 October 21, 2021 8:00 - 17:00

Physical Venue

Taipei International Meeting Center

Website

https://www.hpa.gov.tw/Pages/Detail.aspx?nodeid=4230&pid=11826


Organizer

Ministry of Health and Welfare, R.O.C. (Taiwan)

Ministry of Foreign Affairs, R.O.C. (Taiwan)

Health Promotion Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare, R.O.C. (Taiwan)

Opening Address

Dr. Chien-Jen Chen

Vice President of Taiwan

Dr. Shih-Chung Chen

Minister ofHealth and welfare

Dr. Shih-Chung Chen, Minister of Health and Welfare, welcomned everyone to this year;s Forum, and introduces this year's theme: "urban life of the 21st Century: Sustainable, Safe and Healthy?". Minister Chen then introduced Dr, Chien-Jen Chen, Vice president of Taiwan, Who began his address by mentioning the National Health Insurance (NHI), Which has reached a record-high satisfaction level fo over 89.1%

In addtion, the National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) has established the "NHI Medicloud", which provides patient prescriotions and diagnostic records, to avoid repeated medication and treatment while maintaining the public's medication safety. faced with the diverse needs of an aging society, Taiwan has implemented the Long-Term Care Plan 2.0 since 2017 to prevent and delay the onset of disability, and has also integratrd with home hospice care to fulfill the long-term care needs of Taiwan'a aging population.

Taiwan is also remarkable fot its innovation and comprehensive pharmaceutical and medical devices. The Taiwan Foor and Drug Adminstration (TFDA) has continued to participate in relevant activities promoted under the medical devices Priority Work Area (PWA) of the APEC's Regulatory Harmonization Steering Committee (RHSC).


Taiwan implemented the New Southbound Policy to expand on medical and health cooperation and industrial links with the Asia-Pacific countries, to jointly raise the standard of healthcare, establish a complete epidemic prevention system, medical and health exchanges, and achieve a mutual benefit and win-win goal.

In conclusion, Vice President chen wished a hearty welcome to all of distinguished guests.

Plenary 1

Prof. Charles Agyemang

Professor of Global Migration, Erhnicity and Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands

Influence of Urbanization and Migration on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Migrant and Non-Migrant African Populations: Findings from the RODAM Study

Prof. Agyemang mentioned the society nowadays is ethnically diversifying due to migration. Most migrants are healthy initally, but conditions surrounding migration process and exposure ti new enviroment pose health risks. The three main methods of assessing migrant health inlcude comparing migrants with the host populations, comparing similar migratn group living in different countries, and comparing migrants with source population in the country of origin. Most of the results indicated that incidence of stroke, diabetes, prevalence ratios of hypertension are all higher in migrants.

He then introduced the RODAM study, which aims to understand gene-enviromental interaction in Obesity & T2D, identify relevant rick factors to guide intervention programmes and provide basis for improving diagnosis and treatment. Results of the RODAM study were shown, which concluded that CVD is a major burden in migrant people, and better understanding of the underlying causes of ethic inequalities is required. Solution of the issue requires both population-wide primary prevention approaches and individual health care strategies.

Prof. Kenji Toba

CEO, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Geratrics and Gerontology, Japan

Perpective of Population Aging and Urbanization in Japan

Prof. Kenji Toba focuses on population aging and urbanization issue of Japan. The economic growth accompanies urbanization not only in Japan, but also in the whole world. In Japan, thousands of young people move from rural aresa to urban cities to get jobs, are called "new urban residents".

However, health-related challenges come with rapid urbanization. Air and water pollution are accompanied by rapid industrial growth. To resolve the problem of water pollution, we need to design the perfect supply system with dams and while preventing the flood. During the 20th Century, people establish regulations to address air pollution, such as the "Air Pollution Control Law" in 1968, and also enacted emission regulations stargets on gasoline and diesel.

Moreover, the shortage of electric power, housing, and public transportation are throny issues. Rural villages are being depopulated with half of the remaining inhabitants being 65 years oldere. In urban areas such as Tokyo, the population pyramid is indicative of the trend of aging. With the increase of elderly population, some specific disease, like Alzheimer and frailty, etc., are now more relevant than ever.

2019, Day 1

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2019, Day 2

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